Egg-Citing News: Eat Eggs and Lose Weight

Eggs Every Day Don’t Increase Diabetes Risk

I love eggs. Poached, scrambled, fried, omelets or sunny-side up— you name it, eggs are delicious. Not only that but they’re full of leucine, vitamin D and essential amino acids for muscle growth and weight loss. A new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition says that eating eggs every day will not increase diabetes risk and help promote weight loss.

This is egg-cellent news, if you’re an egg lover! Not only that, but eggs are great for your eyesight and if you keep the egg yolks you can get a great source of vitamins A, D, B6, B12, E and K. Eggs are packed full of vitamin D and proteins. Eggs are great for your hair, nails and skin. You can also get zinc, selenium, iron and copper from the egg whites. We know from previous research that a high-protein diet is key to weight loss. In this study, which was performed by the University of Sydney and lead by Dr. Nicholas Fuller, researchers found that the participants still managed to lose weight even if they were on a “high egg” or “low egg” diet.

In the latest study, researchers reviewed pre-diabetic and diabetic patients and fed them a diet consisting of eggs. Some were fed a “high-egg” diet, which consisted of eating eggs 12 times a week, and others had a “low-egg” diet, which consisted of eating just two eggs weekly. The participants then embarked on a weight-loss diet, and the research showed over a course of a year, eggs had no bearing on diabetic risk and did not increase weight gain.

Now, while it is true that eggs are high in cholesterol, the research also showed that there is small to little impact on the “bad” or LDL cholesterol levels of individuals. However, eggs did help raise the good “HDL” cholesterol. It is also important to note how eggs are cooked that determines this outcome. If a lot of butter and salt are used, that pretty much cancels out the health benefit. However, by cooking them using monounsaturated fats like extra-virgin olive oil or poaching them in simmering water, the eggs themselves maintain their nutritional benefit. Balsamic vinegar or malt vinegar is great on poached eggs— add some smoked salmon, spinach and avocado and you’ll have a great way to start off your morning. Stock up on the eggs and begin your mornings with a protein punch!

 

Reference:

Nicholas R Fuller, Amanda Sainsbury, Ian D Caterson, Gareth Denyer, Mackenzie Fong, James Gerofi, Chloris Leung, Namson S Lau, Kathryn H Williams, Andrzej S Januszewski, Alicia J Jenkins, Tania P Markovic; Effect of a high-egg diet on cardiometabolic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes and Egg (DIABEGG) Study—randomized weight-loss and follow-up phase, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, nqy048, 2018

J.A. Giresi

J.A. Giresi is a contributing editor for FitnessRx and Muscular Development. She is a native Long Islander and the author of the novels The Turn of the Dime, Billy's Cascade and Potholes: A Tale of Murder, Road Rage & Romance. She is also a founding partner and CEO of Double J IT Consulting Services. For more information, visit jagiresi.com

Twitter: @jwgiresi

©2018 Advanced Research Media. Long Island Web Design